Alfie Evans and the Shocking UK Gosport Report

This article was originally posted on the author’s blog (https://nancyvalko.com) and is reprinted with her permission. Nancy Valko has been a registered nurse for 47 years and is a spokesperson for the National Association of Pro-Life Nurses and a member of the Pro-life Healthcare Alliance Advisory Committee. She is also a speaker and writer on medical ethics and other healthcare issues, and a legal nurse consultant.

The Baby Alfie Evans [https://nancyvalko.com/2018/05/04/from-choice-to-no-choice-lessons-from-the-baby-alfie-evans-case/ ] case this year shocked the world, but now we learn his forced death against his parents’ wishes follows a legal and healthcare nightmare in the United Kingdom.

Some of us expressed concerns years ago about the UK’s “Liverpool Care Pathway” which was developed in the 1990s to improve care of the dying by applying “the high standard of palliative care prevalent in hospices to other clinical settings.” But the “Liverpool Care Pathway” went horribly wrong and in 2009, the UK Daily Mail published an article “Euthanasia by the back door: Hospitals ‘death pathway’ is open to error” [http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1210848/Terminally-ill-care-scheme-death-pathway-warn-experts.html ] with cases of non-dying patients considered “not worth saving” who died from the “combination of dehydration and powerful painkillers,” explaining, “Under the Liverpool Care Pathway, doctors can withdraw fluids and drugs from patients if they are deemed close to death. Many are then put on continuous sedation so they die free of pain. But sedation can often mask signs of improvement, meaning doctors may be closing the door on people who would otherwise live for months.”

In 2013, the British Journal of General Practice published  “The Liverpool Care Pathway for the dying: what went wrong?” [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3782767/ ]  The authors acknowledged the problems that led an independent review to call for an end to the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) but concluded, “[A] vacuum left by the abolition of the LCP makes a return to the ‘bad old days’ of poor or non-existent communication about dying a real possibility we would argue that the response to poor use should be right use, not non-use. ” The authors called for “increased funding and training in palliative care and suggest that skills in end-of-life care should become a required competency for all health care professionals.” [Emphasis added.]

 

THE GOSPORT INDEPENDENT PANEL REPORT  

More details of this scandal have just now surfaced in a report on the Gosport War Memorial Hospital [https://www.gosportpanel.independent.gov.uk/panel-report/ ] where patients were often admitted for rehabilitation or respite care. The report concludes that at least 450 patients had their lives “shortened” by denial of food and water along with powerful painkillers between 1989 and 2000. It details cases and concerns and ultimately acknowledges the families’ years-long pleas for the truth. Here is one excerpt:

Those (nurses) who raise concerns about the conduct and practice of colleagues are now widely known as “whistle-blowers.” To put it into context, it is generally agreed that the NHS (National Health Service) has not been good at protecting people who take such a difficult step; as the documents make clear, the events of 1991 were no exception. Nor should the consequences for whistle-blowers be underestimated: these commonly included disciplinary action and undermining of professional credibility.

The documents show that, following a complaint to the Trust in 1998 and the police investigation, it should have become clear to local NHS organisations that there was a serious problem with services at the hospital. Although the successive police investigations undoubtedly complicated the NHS response, it is nevertheless remarkable that at no stage was there a public admission of failure or any public apology. Nor was there a proportionate clinical investigation into what had happened. On the contrary, the documents show numerous instances of defensiveness and denial – to families, to the public and the media, and to health service and other organisations. [Emphasis added.]

 

THE DEATH CULTURE IS VERY HARD TO KILL  

Will charges now be brought against those involved in the Gosport War Memorial Hospital euthanasia deaths? Who knows? The Independent Panel only concluded, “With this Report and an online archive of documentation, the Panel has completed its Terms of Reference.

The Panel now calls upon the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care and the relevant investigative authorities to recognise the significance of what is revealed by the documentation in this Report and to act accordingly.” 

But just as important is the question “Has health care now improved?”

 

Unfortunately, the answer may be “No.” 

As the UK Telegraph reported in 2015 in the article “New NHS (National Health Service) death guidelines ‘worse than Liverpool Care Pathway'”  [ https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/11779213/New-death-guidelines-worse-than-Liverpool-Care-Pathway.html ], the Liverpool Care Pathway was supposedly phased out in 2014 in favor of the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Nevertheless, families were still reporting poor end of life care, including denial of food and water.

[http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3553969/Patients-denied-food-drink-die-Quarter-families-report-loved-ones-starved-fifth-hospital-nurses-rarely-kind-caring.html ]

Now, unlike the Liverpool Care Pathway horrors that were hidden for so long, we had the very public case of Baby Alfie Evans this year where courts enforced the doctors’ decision to shorten his life by removing his ventilator, refused his family’s requests to transfer him or take him home, and even took away his feedings when he continued to breathe for days after the ventilator was removed.

[ http://www.lifenews.com/2018/05/01/ap-fails-to-report-that-alfie-evans-was-denied-food-and-water/  ]

Apparently, the death culture is very hard to kill in the UK and, as we are finding, also in the US.